Tango Moderno


Edinburgh Playhouse
23-25 November 2017

It was a crisp Winter’s evening as I whisked through the city to be on time for my rendezvous with the very beautiful Minky. My companion and Strictly Come Dancing fan of the night. Luckily Minky was running late too, which gave me plenty of time to collect the tickets before her sparkling arrival. Divine never likes to keep a lady waiting. I had received prior knowledge that Vincent Simone wouldn’t be dancing due to a crook back, injured in rehearsal for tonight’s production. But in his place not one, but two very sensual gentlemen – Pasquale La Rocca and Leonel Di Cocco-  brought their own erotic flavour to the tango, filled Vincent’s shoes extremely well, and Flavia was in her element.  Of the situation, Adam Speigel, producer of Tango Moderno  told the Mumble; ‘Both dancers are sensational, world class performers, having represented their countries in ballroom and tango respectively. They have been working with Flavia and the company to ensure that Tango Moderno remains a terrific dance show.‘ Adam was right, they were brilliant, & they were supported by a cast of amazingly versatile dancers and a live band providing the groove, with lead vocals expertly sung by Tom Parsons and Rebecca Liswski.

Tango Moderno is a contemporary take on Tango, infused with Hip-Hop and Breakdancing. Street arts that had their beginnings in rebellion and passion, choreographed and directed by Karen Bruce. The whole production oozed sex and was packed with eye-candy. From the moment the lights went down the audience were on the edge of their seats, captivated by the athletic flow of the stars of the show and any disappointment from the audience that Strictly’s Vincent was absent dissipated in an instant. The stage set was a street scene complimented by lighting that was equally as sensual as the moves presented. Indeed, Flavia Cacace was mesmerizing. The closing dance was led on violin by Oliver Lewis, who happened to be the Guinness Book Of Records fastest violinist in the world, smashing the previous record on the BBC’s Blue Peter in 2010. This was a show that left everyone wondering why they had missed their calling to be a professional dancer. The standing ovation at the climax and the musky odour was a testament to how hot this show had been.

Reviewer : Mark ‘Divine’ Calvert

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An Interview with Kevin Quantum

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This Christmas, the Edinburgh International Magic Festival will be returning for a four-night run. In the lead-up to that wonderful event, The Mumble will be chatting to some of the performers, starting with the irrepressible talent that is Kevin Quantum.


Hello Kevin, so where ya from & where ya at, geographically speaking?
I’m in Edinburgh, near the Botanic Gardens. Lovely part of the world.

When did you first realise you were, well, magical?
After being on a reality TV show. I was a physicist up until 12 years ago. Then I was plucked from obscurity to go on C4’s Faking It and found I had not just an aptitude but a love for being on stage. So I ceased the PhD and became a magician. Needless to say mummy was surprised.

You are a Guinness World Record Breaker, can you tell us about it?
Sure, like most of my work it was a collaboration, this time between myself and Royal Blind Charity here in Edinburgh. We brought 2000+ people together and I taught them a magic trick. The biggest magic lesson ever! It was so surreal.

You’ve recently gone down well at the Adelaide Fringe. Can you tell us about the experience?
What a blast! I loved Adelaide. A wonderful city. I made friends and won awards and had sell out crowds. Kinda the perfect overseas tour. I’m not really one for the city-city tour circuit. It’s pretty tough moving every day somewhere new, so when a festival opportunity arrises then I’m well up for it. Edinburgh and Adelaide have lots in common, they both come alive during the fringe. I felt right at home.

What does Kevin Quantum like to do when he’s not being, well, magical?
I play in a tennis league, I compose music for guitar and bass, I spend time with my family. My daughter is 4 now and I love spending time with her. I have a huge family (mum is one of 9 kids and dad is one of 7 so lots of cousins, uncles, aunts etc ) and I’m one of 4 kids myself. We’re close and I really take the time to spend time with them. I love them all.

You are coming to Edinburgh this winter to perform at the International Christmas Special. Your show utilises visual magic with modern technology and unique inventions, what’s the backstory?
It comes from the Faking It show. I was a physicist before becoming a magician and recently I’ve realised they have a bit of a cross over. I just try and find some cool science and eek the magic our of it. Or take a cool magic trick and frame it with science.

You know a good show when its happened, what are the special ingredients?
From the performer’s side, there are three things. 1) attention to detail. 2) Rehearsal. 3) Heart.

Will you be catching any other magicians over the festive period?
I don’t know if there are any other magic shows on in Edinburgh over the festive period? Morgan And West were here last year and I spent a bit of time with them. Great guys.

What does the rest of 2017 hold in store for Kevin Quantum?
I’m doing my first full evening show in London. Can’t wait for that. Off to Alicante, Moscow and a top secret project I can’t talk about. It’s not ‘strictly’ but I wish it was. The rest of the time prep for MagicFest xmas, and my 2018 tour to Australia. It’s two months this time and I’m going to Perth too. Bring it on!

An Interview with Thomas Small

In two weeks time, an internationally-acclaimed piece of physical theatre shall be hitting East Lothian. The Mumble managed to catch a few words with multi-award winning choreographer, Thomas Small.


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Hello Thomas, so where ya from & where ya at, geographically speaking?
I am born and bred in Dundee, a pure Dundonian through and through. At this very moment, I am in Ibiza enjoying my holidays after a very busy Summer term.

When did you first realise you you could dance?
I realised I wanted to direct productions early on when I was about 13 years old and I used to boss my friends around to create shows. Then contemporary dance really got into me and I decided to study it to become a professional. Still, my interest was not in performance but in choreography and direction.

Where did you study the art of dancing & how did it go?
I was very fortunate to receive local support to study in one of the world leading institutions, the London Contemporary Dance School, The Place, where I studied under the tutelage of leading experts from all corners of the world.

What does Thomas Small like to do when he’s not involved in dancing?
I love walking my dog Molly, meeting friends for cocktails and karaoke, and just lately I am getting the exercise bug with my personal trainer.

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Can you tell us about Shaper/Caper?
Shaper/Caper is a charity based in Dundee. The company makes dance-theatre productions that tour nationally and internationally, as well as delivering an impressive creative learning portfolio, with just one of our projects reaching 7,000 primary school children per year in Tayside. We work with people of all ages and abilities, from babies to 101 years old (our oldest dancer, so far!) and are known for our site-specific and mass participation work. We are lucky to have robust and long-lasting partnerships with organisations such as NHS Tayside and the McManus: Dundee’s Art and Gallery Museum. We are also regularly supported by Creative Scotland, CashBack for Creativity, and Leisure and Culture Dundee, through the Dundee Dance Partnership.

Can you describe your creative relationship with Clore Fellow?
Creative Scotland supported my attendance to the full Clore Fellowship programme, where I was able to learn first-hand from world-leading cultural forerunners on governance, cultural policy, and insider tips such as failure, something that we tend not to talk enough about it socially, risking to recognise its transformational power. The experience and knowledge have shaped the way we operate the company and has also provided incredible network opportunities and friendships of the most disparate nature.

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Yolanda Aguilar

You guys also organise creative learning projects headed by Yolanda Aguilar. Can you tell us about these?
Yolanda is an experienced professional trained in dance and theatre, with a Masters in cultural management. She has led international creative learning commissions, and her expertise lies in working with vulnerable groups such as older dancers and those with non-traditional abilities and alternative learning pathways.

You are just about to start a Scottish tour of ‘Within This Dust’ can you tell us about it?
We are looking forward to sharing our piece with Scottish audiences after having performed at the 9/11 Memorial and Museum in New York, where the work was informed by the expert Chief curator Jan Seidler Ramirez and by Dr Lindsay Balfour’s profound analysis of the art and its context. Unfortunately, the theme of terrorism and its impact on Western and global societies continue to be relevant, so we want to engage in a dialogue with our audiences with the view to eventually effect change.

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What was it like to perform at the 9/11 Memorial Museum in New York City as part of the museum’s 15-year anniversary programme?
It was the most overwhelming experience, both poignant and beautiful at the same time. We were given several private tours with access to information not shared with the general public that made our presence there just so special. It was sold-out and the museum placed a screen in the foyer so people could join us and it was also live-streamed, so the event became global. New York audiences are very immediate with their reactions and people were happy to fully disclose their emotions, experiences and memories during the post-show discussion. We also met Richard Drew, the photographer that captured the iconic image of the falling man plunging form the World Trade Centre and that was the inspiration for this work. I was very humbled by the generosity of all involved in the event, from cultural partners to audiences, as my work became the catalyst for an honest and moving conversation.

How has the show evolved since its premier to today?
The piece started in 2011 with a research and development period working with one male dancer, as at the time it was envisioned as a single solo piece of work, rather than the triptych that has become. The production now also includes a female dancer, and although this has been the case so far I am not too concerned about the gender of my artists, so who knows? This might change in the future. The show starts with the female solo in a section called Embers, then moves to a duet in S/He, and ends with the Falling Man, the original male solo. The show received Made in Scotland support in 2012 and toured Berlin and Brazil. The production has been informed by different casts over the years and by the political circumstances the world has experienced since, so it now feels like the best existence it never had.

What does the rest of 2017 hold in store for Thomas Small?
We have just finished our Business Plan with the Board, which will take our activities until 2021, so there will be more productions touring the world, and more creative learning projects to reach across Scotland. I am now making a film to support the Dundee 2023 bid for European Capital of Culture, a great project to involve the community and show that Dundee used to be well known in Scotland for its dance halls. I will be starting shortly the production phase of my new show Unwanted, a tongue-in-cheek meets psychotherapy cabaret-like space that explores failure and invites all to share and celebrate its inevitability, accepting it as part of growth.


Within This Dust can be seen at The Brunton Theatre on 21st October at 7:30 pm. Tickets can be booked via The Brunton website or calling 0131 665 2240.  For further information about Within This Dust, visit www.shapercaper.com